Sudbury Branch News

We believe that RWTO/OERO Is an organization which meets the needs of retired women teachers. We welcome you to join us at our events.

For more information, contact President:
Suzanne Rondeau, President 2014-2016: suzannerondeau20@gmail.com

Nous croyons que RWTO/OERO est une organisation qui répond aux besoins des enseignantes retraitées Nous vous invitons à nous rejoindre lors de nos événements.
Pour plus d’informations, contactez Présidente:
Suzanne Rondeau, President 2014-2016: suzannerondeau20@gmail.com


RESOURCES

Meet our new RWTO-OWRO Executive for the year 2016-2017

Louise Sutcliffe, Goodwill Committee; Hénédine Weiman, Area Director: Nancy Roussellle, Treasurer; Jocelyn McInnes, Insurance Convenor; Suzanne Rondeau, President; Lorraine Blais, Social Committee;
Sitting: Laurianne Valiquette, 2nd Vice-President; Jeannine Renaud, Past-President, Erna Fex, 1st Vice-President
CONGRATULATIONS

If you are interested in joining our local group in Sudbury, please contact:
johnnlauri@bell.net

Convention 2017

Célébrating Canada’s 150th Birthday

Last year, at the May luncheon meeting ,2016, all members received three Canada150 Tulips. Their mission was to bring one each at the May 18,  luncheon meeting in 2017 . The result was disappointing because of the cold and wet  spring . Fortunately, the tulips grew and grew and became magnificent later on in the month.

Cora Bailey Awards 2017

 

June 2017

Our 10th annual RWTO-OERO GOLF TOURNAMENT was a happy and successful event. Twenty-six (26 )members and friends attended the ” golf and lunch” at the Twin Stacks Golf Course and the Colonial Inn .

  Celebrating 150 Years

 

January 2017


Forty ladies, members and friends, from our local RWTO-OERO braved the cold weather to come and celebrate our Holiday Festivities on Dec. 8, 2016, at the Lexington Hotel, Sudbury.

We are pleased to introduce Denise, our guest at the luncheon, with Louise and Laurianne.

Always a thrill to welcome a mother-daughter, members of RWTO-OERO team.

Dolores is presenting a poinsettia plant to Dorothy, who is in our 90’s club. Bravo!!

The musical group “Northern Echos” lead by Jocelyn McInnes, harmoniously sang seasonal songs to entertain us in the afternoon.

Members are seen at this table enjoying a “musical gift” game.

Complementary Christmas fruit cake and cookies were available at the coffee-tea table.

Hénédine Weiman and Dolores Doucet are enjoying a tasty treat before the luncheon.

Our new member Rosemarie is explaining the rules of our “gift game”. It was fun.

A “Guess the Christmas Carol” game during the celebration, on Dec. 8th, 2016.

“Guess the Christmas Carol” game before lunch.

October 2016

You have contributed greatly in making our October 4th RWTO-OERO luncheon-meeting a success. Your presentation dealing with Parkinson’s Disease was very enlightening. Thanks to you. The Parkinson’s Support Group Centre in Sudbury is such a valuable, welcoming and healing place to visit.

Laurianne Valiquette Communications Convenor, RWTO-OERO


September 2016

Jeannine Maurice, a member of RWTO-OERO since 1984, is enjoying her new room at Pioneer Manor. The bouquet was graciously giving to her by Louise Sutcliffe, Goodwill Committee.


Celebrating the RWTO/OERO 60th Anniversary

Gloria Packard, seen here with the bouquet of flowers, graciously donated to our organization a photo album of treasured pictures that she photographed at the celebration of RWTO-OERO’s 60th Anniversary, on May 17, 2016.

Two members, Laurianne Valiquette and Louise Sutcliffe, gratefully accepted the archival book.

The members enjoyed singing this oldie melody to new appropriate lyrics, adapted by Louise Sutcliffe. It added a wonderful musical note to our 60th RWTO-OERO Celebration.

Try it, you’ll like it.

Lillian Wahamaa is our latest inductee in our RWTO-OERO 90’s Club in Sudbury ON. Congratulations and many good years to come.

Dorothy Lawrence,(seated) Jeannine Renaud and Louise Sutcliffe, enjoying the 60th RWTO/OERO Celebrations.


Mother’s and Daughters


Our branch, Sudbury, Area 10, is blessed that we have two Mother/daughter members.
Pictured above is Dorothy Lawrence and her daughter Sharon Urquhart.

May I present mother Rita Zubac and her daughter Zandra Zubac.


1954 Boarding at The Colonial Inn, Coniston, ON

When Laurianne asked me to present some information on the Colonial Inn in Coniston I really wondered what I could remember. That is 62 years ago since I stayed there when I was teaching in Coniston at the Public School. I lived there for two years. There were a number of teachers living there at the time. There were two of us from the Public Board and six or seven from the Separate Board. We all had a fairly big room with large closets – almost walk in.

There were High School teachers there also. Other Inco people and retired people also lived there.there were hardwood floors throughout the building. Mr. And Mrs. Caverson were the caretakers cooks and general caretakers of the building. Mrs. Caver son was a great cook and provided the meals for the day which were varied and excellent.

We had an appointed table and chair where we were to sit. We ladies shared a bathroom which consisted of two toilets, three sinks and two tubs , no showers – they were downstairs someplace. There was a Separate classroom in the building – I believe it was a grade one class.

My room was quite comfortable, however, sometimes in the winter it would be rather chilly and being at the end of the hall I guess the heat ran out before it got to me especially when it was windy. I did have a small heater which I could use.

We had Christmas get togethers – not parties in some of our rooms where we shared Christmases past and other topics and maybe what we were doing f or our Christmas Concerts. That was always exciting. Our children sure miss out on that nowadays.

The building was built in 1918 by Inco and used as a boarding house. Many town offices were also housed there It was converted to Colonial Inn in 1976. Ron and Stella Legault purchased the landmark building and business in 1979. Today it operates as an apartment building, busy restaurant and bar and catering service. Many public and private celebrations are held there in the spacious Banquet Room. You can go on line and see some pictures of the building and the Banquet Rooms.


A Teacher Remembers

by Erna da Burger Fex

So many people express the opinion that teaching is an easy job with all the holidays etc. Sharing some memories of my teaching career may give you different perspectives.

I well remember my first day of teaching at Creighton Mine Public School in 1962. I was excited and also somewhat apprehensive. I had also purchased a new dress to add to my confidence level. The 34 kids were great! Discipline problems were minimal. Special days like Hallowe’en, Remembrance Day, Christmas of course, lent themselves to planning enjoyable activities! It was wonderful to see the pupils having fun and learning at the same time. One of my pupils became very ill so I went to her home several times a week to help her keep up with the class. She did very well and passed with 80+%. I was very proud of her!

I got married December 28, 1963, and returning to school in January 1964, I wondered if the children would remember my new name. I had a jar on my desk for pennies for the Red Cross. Every Friday afternoon we had a relaxing hour of learning about the Red Cross and the wonderful work this organisation did. That’s why we were collecting these pennies. It was also a fun time with skits, stories, show-and-tell, the opportunity for my pupils to explain, learn to speak in front of their classmates, a skill they were developing without realising it. In order for the children to become accustomed to my new name, if they said “Miss de Burger”, they had to put a penny in that jar. Decades later I often met some of my former pupils and they would remind me of that penny jar. We never know what children will remember in later years. Fascinating!

Sometimes my young pupils confided something that had happened at home. I had to impress upon them that this was private and should not be talked about to their classmates.

When I became pregnant in 1964 my resignation letter was requested by the school board. That’s how it was then. I had no choice.

In 1967, I was teaching grade 3 at Naughton Public School where I had just 21 pupils. This small class made it possible to do many interesting activities teaching the pupils about Canada, our phenomenal, diverse country. It was Centennial Year, the song, “Ca-na-da, We Love You”, reverberated throughout the school.

Near the end of June, while we were playing outside, a nine-year-old girl collapsed. I noticed immediately that her lips were blue and her skin was almost translucent. One of the children ran to get the principal who carried her inside and called her mother. At Memorial Hospital in Sudbury, surgery was performed, unsuccessfully. The child died. What an unbelievable shock! Her mother told us that she had a congenital heart defect unknown to the family. (911 did not exist, neither did CPR nor ultrasounds).

I really enjoyed teaching in the Primary level. Children are unpredictable and unexpected things happen. One day, a little girl said, “Mrs. Fex, Mrs. Fex , Ricky took his eye out.” I couldn’t imagine what she was talking about but Ricky had a glass eye, unknown to me – and he had indeed taken it out of its socket. I sent him to the principal and he returned with a large gauze pad over the socket and the eye in a small bag to take home. He began to do this more frequently, until the principal called his mother and it stopped! Another little boy liked the feel of my nylons and would run his hand up and down while we were in reading group. Cleaning up children’s vomit happened now and then. I couldn’t just leave it there! Nothing in my teacher’s training had prepared me for any of these events. One child, upset because his Dad had not come to see him that weekend, bit the supervising teacher on her arm at recess to get her attention. A very bright boy in Grade 2 needed me to continually develop projects to keep him interested in school. We discovered that he was already reading at Grade 7 level and he was just 7 years old. That was an exciting challenge for me. The diversity of the roles of being a teacher was that I seldom knew what to expect when I left for school every morning but that it would be interesting.

Toward the end of my teaching career, in a different school, the children were constantly challenging me. A girl in Grade 7 told me that she was going to stab me and, “Throw my organs all over the yard at my house.” Those were her exact words! In the office, shaking like a leaf, I told the principal. We called her mother who, to her credit, insisted that we call the police. The OPP officer arrived quickly. He spoke with me, the principal and the girl. He asked me if I wanted to lay charges against this 15 year old. Knowing this girl’s history, I said “NO”. Later I realised this was a big mistake on my part. She needed to understand that uttering a death threat was a serious crime.

I soon learned that many things happened with children which were totally unpredictable and I had to deal with them in the best way I knew how. It was never boring! This is what made teaching so stimulating to me.

An Old Woman’s Opinions On Logos, Litter and Dog Logs

Other Articles by Erna Fex

Reflections: Remembering the pageantry and skill of the RCMP Musical Ride

Cane Adventures

Food For My Soul

Nothing To Do

Canada’s Flag

 

 9th Annual Golf Tournament

Meet the Happy Gang.

The members and guests at our 9th annual Golf Tournament had. Great time on the golf course and at the luncheon afterwards.


June Golf Tournament

FUN IN THE SUN
RWTO-OERO 9 th Annual Golf Tournament
Tuesday,June 14, 2016
Twin Stacks Golf Course, Sudbury,  ON
Golf walk, $16.00-Golf carts, $16.00- Best Ball Contest
Lunch at 12:30 p.m. at Colonial Inn, Coniston
Not a golfer? Then please join us for lunch only.
Please contact Laurianne at 705-566-1443 for further information

Current Newsletter

Archived Newsletters

Cora Bailey Award 2016

Collecting Glasses

 We are collecting old  glasses, cases and stamps for charity.

Do bring them at every luncheon- meetings.

For Haiti

Laurianne Valiquette is showing the different steps in making the rugs out of plastic milk bags.

Two very hardworking volunteers are collecting the mats for shipping to Haiti.

The hardworking team of our RWTO-OERO members.

A photo of the variety of mats produced on a loom or with a crochet by our members.

Jeannine Renaud is showing an example of a cushion made with plastic milk bags.

In Memoriam

It is with deep sadness that we announce the death of our dear member Isabel Grant ,who passed away in Ottawa On. at the age of 102, on May 22, 2017.

Her funeral will be held in Sudbury, on July 18, 2017, at Christ The King Church.